ELLY is in Ireland!

elly cover_webThe ELLY HAYS book tour has taken a detour to the beautiful Isle of Green. Today, we stop by Ireland at “History with a Twist” to visit with author David Lawlor. Stop over there and check it out. You can comment and win an eBook, but you’ll have to scroll down to the bottom of the page, passing amazing authors and their GREAT books. Don’t get lost. 🙂 Click HERE to visit!

While you’re checking out great books today, go to Amazon HERE and check out David’s books, “The Golden Grave” and “Tan.”

My ELLY HAYS book tour is stopping at Writing Whims today!

elly cover_webELLY HAYS is at Writing Whims today!

If you’ve ever wanted to know anything about me but were too shy to ask, author PC Zick at Writing Whims did the asking for you. Run over to her page HERE and read my amazing and jaw-dropping answers. 😛

THEN, comment on the interview and be entered to win a free eBook.

THEN, check out PC Zick’s books on Amazon HERE. Her latest is a “Civil War Journal of a Union Soldier” which is a real journal of a real person who was really there. It’s stunning. I read it! I also loved “Trails in the Sand.”

ELLY HAYS book tour – at Sandi Layne’s today!

elly cover_webToday’s stop on the ELLY HAYS book tour is at author Sandi Layne’s blog. Sandi asked me why I wrote ELLY HAYS, and that’s what the blog is about. Elly isn’t just another story — it is the story of my 5th great grandmother. I am honored and proud to share her life with you, TWO HUNDRED YEARS later. You can read the article right HERE!  Also, don’t forget to comment over there to win a free eBook.

 

While you’re at it, check out Sandi’s award-winning books on Amazon right HERE. She is a fabulous and prolific writer! I hope to have that many books out someday. 🙂

ELLY HAYS Book Tour – Interview with Elly

elly book tourHi everyone! Thanks for stopping by the book tour today. We’re in the middle of the ELLY HAYS book tour which will wrap up on Saturday with a Twitter chat. Please check http://www.LoriCraneAuthor.com for a list of events, also, check the bottom of this page for a giveaway!

Today, we have with us the heroine of ELLY HAYSthe one and only… Elly Hays!

Lori: So, Elly, since you’re my 5th great grandmother, I know quite a bit about you, but please tell our readers a little about yourself.

Elly: Sure. I was born in 1774, just before the Revolutionary War, in North Carolina, right on the border of Tennessee. We actually lived in Tennessee. The varying records from both states make my descendants crazy when they try to look up the family.

Lori: Tell me about it. (I need a sarcasm font.)

Elly: My dad’s name was Samuel Hays and my mom was Elizabeth Priscilla Brawford.

Lori: Where were your parents from?

Elly: Dad was from Tennessee, mom was from Virginia.

Lori: Is Tennessee where you met your husband?

Elly: Yes, James Rodgers was born in Tennessee. We married there when I was only 16 years old–just a child.

Lori: Yes, by today’s standards, you were just a child. Did you make your home in Tennessee?

Elly: We lived there for a long time. After having 11 children, we finally moved in 1812.

Lori: What happened in 1812?

Elly: Well, the first thing that happened was a massive earthquake in December 1811 the shook the Ohio River Valley to its core. That was followed by two more earthquakes in January and February of 1812. Crevasses opened up in the earth, homes were destroyed. I even heard the Mississippi River was flowing backwards in spots. Our home was ruined.

Lori: So, what did you do?

Elly: At the same time, the War of 1812 was just beginning in the north, so James wanted to move further south to keep the children out of harm’s way. He convinced me to move.

Lori: To the Mississippi Territory?

Elly: Yes. Well, I believe you modern people now call it Alabama.

Lori: Yes, Alabama is a state now.

Elly: It was back then too, but not until 1819. We had already left that god-forsaken hell-hole by then.

Lori: Why? What happened?

Elly: What didn’t happen? We didn’t know when we moved there, the Creek Indians who occupied the land were in the middle of a civil war.

Lori: A civil war? That must have been terrifying.

Elly: That wasn’t the worst part. They also didn’t want us settlers living there, so they tortured my family for years. Every day was something else. One day, they slaughtered all my farm animals. The next day, they destroyed my crops.

Lori: Oh my! What did you do?

Elly: I fought back the best way I could. My number one priority was to keep my children safe, but in the end, I couldn’t even do that.

Lori: So, what happened?

Elly: Well, the final straw was when they burned down our house and everything in it.

Lori: What did you do then?

Elly: Well, you’ll have to read the book and find out, won’t you?

Lori: Well, you heard her. Get your copy of ELLY HAYS! You can pick it up HERE.

Grandma Elly, thank you for coming by the blog today. We loved meeting you.

Elly: It was my pleasure. I hope everyone enjoys the story.

**********************************************

GIVEAWAYS

1. EBOOK!  Every comment on this post during the book tour (Nov 4-16) will be entered to win an ebook of the 1st or 2nd book in the Okatibbee Creek series, OKATIBBEE CREEK or AN ORPHAN’S HEART. Your choice of Kindle or Nook. One winner will be chosen. Prize will be delivered by email. Winner will be posted here in the comments on November 17, 2013. Visit each stop of the tour to increase your chances. An ebook will be given away at each stop. Tour schedule is posted below.

2. $25 AMAZON GIFT CARD! If you sign up for Lori’s newsletter by November 16th, you will be entered into the drawing for a $25.00 Amazon Gift Card. One winner will be chosen. Prize will be delivered by email. Winner will be announced in the newsletter on November 18, 2013. Sign up at www.LoriCraneAuthor.com.

***********************************************

elly cover_webNov 4-16, 2013 – ELLY HAYS Book Tour. Meet the Author. Win Prizes. Get the Book.

 

 

ELLY HAYS book tours stops today at Readful Things

elly cover_webThe ELLY HAYS book tour stopped by Readful Things this morning and left a short excerpt. Pop over there and check it out. There’s also a GIVEAWAY!

And while you’re there, check out her other blogs. If you’re looking for a great read, she had lots and lots of suggestions. Click HERE! 

The entire book tour schedule is posted on my website HERE.

ELLY HAYS Book Tour Stops at Anna Belfrage’s Today!

elly cover_webMy ELLY HAYS book tour is stopping by Anna Belfrage’s blog today!

Pop over there and check it out. Click here! You can learn a little about the War of 1812, and who wouldn’t want that?!

While you’re at it, check out Anna’s books at Amazon here. I’m currently finishing the first book and excitedly anticipating the next.

51XARpMYKDL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA278_PIkin4,BottomRight,-69,22_AA300_SH20_OU01_Her new book is A NEWFOUND LAND. I’m in love with her covers. You can see all her amazing covers on a blog I wrote here.

Book Tour Stop Nov 6 – Author Pat Fitzhugh’s

elly cover_webMy ELLY HAYS tour stop for Nov 6th is at author Pat Fitzhugh’s. Pat penned the foreword for my book “The Legend of Stuckey’s Bridge” and is the foremost authority on the Bell Witch! NOBODY can tell a ghost story like this man. Check out his work on Amazon and visit my guest blog on his page. If you comment over there, you can win one of my books!

 

 

 

 

trilogy_websites

For the complete ELLY HAYS tour schedule, please visit my website!

ELLY HAYS Book Tour – Video Trailer Debut

Worldwide debut of the ELLY HAYS video trailer!!

elly cover_webAs the War of 1812 approached, the Creek Indian Nation was in the middle of a civil war. They fought brutally between themselves, as well as with the white settlers who were encroaching upon tribal land.

It was during this time Elly’s family moved to the eastern Mississippi Territory for the promise of low-cost land and fertile soil. She had no idea they were moving into Creek territory – into the middle of a hornet’s nest.

Tafv’s band of warriors taunted them, stealing their property, killing their animals, and destroying their livelihood. Just when the family thought things couldn’t get any worse, during one of the Indian raids as Elly’s husband chased the Indians away from the farm, Tafv’s young son was killed in the pursuit. Tafv vowed revenge against Elly’s family, and a final showdown was imminent.

Elly Hays is based on the real-life story of Elizabeth Hays Rodgers and is the epic clash between a fearless warrior with nothing to lose and a young mother on the verge of losing everything.

 

***************************************

        GET YOUR COPY OF “ELLY HAYS” HERE

***************************************

GIVEAWAYS 

1. EBOOK!  Every comment on this post during the book tour (Nov 4-16) will be entered to win an ebook of the 1st or 2nd book in the Okatibbee Creek series, OKATIBBEE CREEK or AN ORPHAN’S HEART. Your choice of Kindle or Nook. One winner will be chosen. Prize will be delivered by email. Winner will be posted here in the comments on November 17, 2013. Visit each stop of the tour to increase your chances. An ebook will be given away at each stop. Tour schedule is posted on my website at www.LoriCraneAuthor.com.

2. $25 AMAZON GIFT CARD! If you sign up for Lori’s newsletter by November 16th, you will be entered into the drawing for a $25.00 Amazon Gift Card. One winner will be chosen. Prize will be delivered by email. Winner will be announced in the newsletter on November 18, 2013. Sign up at www.LoriCraneAuthor.com.

October Ancestry Challenge – Elizabeth “Elly” Hays

oct ancestry challenge-001 October Ancestry Challenge 2013

23 days – 23 posts – 23 ancestors

Ancestor #20 – Elizabeth “Elly” Hays

My fifth great grandma was Elizabeth “Elly” Hays. She was born just before the start of the Revolutionary War on the Tennessee-North Carolina border to Samuel Hays and Elizabeth Pricilla Brawford.

 

Marriage document James Rodgers and Elizabeth Hays GreeneCoTN1790Elly was sixteen when she married James Rodgers in Tennessee on 20 Dec 1790. The document to the left is their marriage license. She birthed twelve children.

In 1811, the family packed up and moved to the eastern Mississippi Territory – a place called Alabama, which wouldn’t become a state until 1819. You know how difficult it is going on a road trip with little kids in the car? Imagine being on a wagon for two months with a dozen of the little rug rats and not a McDonalds in sight.

This was a time in history when the U. S. was flexing its political muscle and tensions were escalating, leading up to the War of 1812. And little did the Rodgers family know, they were moving into Creek territory. Not only were the Creek Indians fighting the U.S. Government, they had also broken into two factions and were fighting among themselves in a civil war called the Red Stick War. The Rodgers family moved into the middle of a hornet’s nest. They were harassed for years by the marauding Indians, who taunted them and stole their livestock, and the final straw, burnt down their home.

In 1815, her two eldest sons, Hays (Ancestor #18) and Absolom, joined the Mississippi Militia to help fight off the hostile Creek Indians, and following the boy’s discharges in 1818, the family moved west to Lauderdale County, Mississippi.

James died in Mississippi eight years later, and Elly moved back to Clarke County, Alabama and probably lived with her daughter Elizabeth. She died in the 1830s in her 60s in Grove Hill, Alabama. The exact date of her death is unknown. Her burial place is unknown.

elly cover_webElizabeth Hays Rodgers is the heroine of my book “Elly Hays” which is the third book in the Okatibbee Creek series.

October Ancestry Challenge – Hays Rodgers

oct ancestry challenge-001

 

 The October Ancestry Challenge 2013

23 posts – 23 days – 23 ancestors.

 Ancestor #18 – Hays Rodgers

 

 

Rodgers Hays SrHays Rodgers was my 4th great grandfather. He was married to Marey Ann Scott and had 14 children: Lewis, James, Allen, Jackson, Susannah, Stephen, William, Mary Ann (heroine of my book Okatibbee Creek and my 3rd great grandmother, ancestor #17), Timothy, Hays Jr, Wilson, John W, Elizabeth and Martha Jane. Geez, how can you even remember all those names. I call my two dogs by each other’s names.

His sons, Stephen and William, died in 1834 at the ages of 8 and 10. His son, James, died of typhoid in Nov of 1862. Between 1863 and 1864, his sons, Timothy, Wilson and John W,  all  died during the Civil War. Timothy and Wilson died of illness. John died of a gunshot wound to the stomach in Jonesboro, GA. Fortunately, Hays was not alive to witness the soldier’s deaths as he died of typhoid in Dec of 1862, a couple weeks after his son James.

He was born 1 Feb 1783 in Greene County, TN to James Rodgers and Elizabeth “Elly” Hays (heroine of my new book Elly Hays). He was the eldest son of 12 children. At the age of 18, he moved with his parents to Clarke Co, AL which was part of the Mississippi Territory at that time. Alabama didn’t become a state until 1819. He and his brother, Absolom, signed up for the Mississippi Militia in 1814, and were assigned to Capt Evan Austill’s company of volunteers in Maj Sam Dale’s Battalion to fight against the hostile Creek Indians. Hays remained in the Militia until Oct 1818, but was only called out once for a two-month tour.

MS Cemetery 076On 11 Dec 1816, he married Marey Ann Scott, who was from Georgia. In 1818, following the end of his military service, he, Marey, and 1st born Lewis, moved to Copiah Co, MS (what later became Simpson, MS). He started buying land and farming. He built the “Ole Stennis House” in 1857 at the age of 61 (with the help of 13 slaves). In 1860, the U.S. Census states Hays owned 13 slaves, a 640 acre (square mile) plantation, 2 horses, 3 mules, 10 cows, 4 oxen, 16 sheep, 60 swine, and $600 in farming instruments, for a total worth of $8400. However, most of his wealth was tied up in slaves, as they were worth about $1000 each – that’s probably a million bucks in today’s money.

Upon his death in Dec 1862 in Lauderdale Co, MS, he owned 690 acres of land and stock in the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, which was sold and divided between his heirs. His wife died three months after him in March of 1863, also of typhoid.

His property was sold in 1869 at public auction on the steps of the Meridian Courthouse to Major Adam T Stennis, hence the name “Ole Stennis House.” It remained in the Stennis family for 100 years until 1970, then sat abandoned for two decades. It is now owned by the Hover family who have restored it as you can see by the photo above. Right before the property was auctioned in 1869, Hays Jr, who was the only son to return home from the war, albeit with a useless arm and a wilted spirit, sold his farm and moved to Alabama to be near his wife’s family. He sold his farm to a black man named Tom Stennis. Tom Stennis was a former slave to Major Adam T Stennis.

elly cover_web